Barrow Street Theatre

We have some big news to report here at artofneed, but first off, Happy Holidays to you all. I hope everyone is having good cheer with family and friends and able to enjoy these times.

malachy_mccourt

Mr. Malachy McCourt, who knows a thing or two about the Irish, New York and their deep relations, has said some very wonderful things about Light of the Diddicoy.

Second, I’m sorry I haven’t had many posts lately. I just moved, and since this is the WORST time of year to move, I have been consumed with holiday planning and moving. I promise we’ll soon have a very fun blog up called The Gangs of Brooklyn, a look at the time frame from the Great Hunger through just before Prohibition (1845-1919). This blog ought to be a lot of fun for most of you.

In big news, famed author Malachy McCourt has thrown his considerable weight behind Light of the Diddicoy. In a recent quote, he said:

“Eamon Loingsigh’s book Light of the Diddicoy is an amazing series of literary leaps from terra firma into the stratosphere above. The writing embraces you, and his description of the savagery visited on poor people is offset by the humor and love of the traditional Irish community. Yes there is laughter here too and it is a grand read, leaving any reader fully sated. Don’t leave the store without this book.”

Barrow St 2

You CAN’T miss this… Nope

On January 16, 2014 Mr. McCourt (brother of Pulitzer Prize winning memoirist Frank McCourt) will actually read from Light of the Diddicoy at the historical Barrow Street Theatre! Very Exciting! You don’t want to miss it!

On top of watching Malachy McCourt read from Light of the Diddicoy, playwright, director and actor Israel Horovitz will read from fellow Three Rooms Press author Richard Vetere’s upcoming book The Writers Afterlife.

It’s going to be a huge night!

To reserve tickets, send an email here:
info@threeroomspress.com

Barrow St Theatre

The Barrow Street Theatre, located in the Greenwich House, is in the West Village of Manhattan at 27 Barrow Street.

Here’s a little bit about the Barrow Street Theatre – A 199 seat Off-Broadway venue located in the West Village, NYC operated by Producers Scott Morfee and Tom Wirtshafter. The building was originally opened in 1902 by progressives who sought to alleviate the poverty and over-population of the area during the time. With the vision of Mary Kingsbury Simkhovitch, famous photographers like Jacob Riis gathered there to help immigrants adjust to city life.

I hope you all have a great holiday, and in the spirit of the Irish Christmas in New York, here’s a classic song and video from Shane MacGowan and The Pogues:

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About eamonblog

I am Eamon Loingsigh, author of the Auld Irishtown trilogy. The first book in the trilogy is "Light of the Diddicoy," (Three Rooms Press 2014). The second is "Exile on Bridge Street," (Three Rooms Press 2016). This blog is mostly concerned with the books and the history of Brooklyn, the Irish-Americans and the gangs of Brooklyn and New York. I have also written lots of other stuff, namely two other books, the first called, "An Affair of Concoctions" and the book of poetry, "Love and Maladies." There are also articles sprinkled around the internet about anything from the anarchist movement of the Spanish Civil War to the French Symbolists of late 1800s Paris to the Irish Famine. With a degree in journalism and a passion for writing, there are lots of topics I have covered. To get in touch, send an email to: eamonloingsigh@gmail.com. Oh by the way, my last name is pronounced "Lynch." Eamon Loingsigh
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